COUVENT DES JACOBINS
& MUSÉE DES BEAUX-ARTS / RENNES
 
« DEBOUT ! »
 
THIS SUMMER, THE PINAULT COLLECTION HAS BEEN INVITED BY NATHALIE APPÉRÉ, MAYOR OF RENNES, TO PRESENT A SELECTION OF WORKS IN THE CITY’S COUVENT DES JACOBINS AND AN INSTALLATION AT THE MUSÉE DES BEAUX-ARTS.
<br> <br> <div class="col m-10"> <span class="title">« DEBOUT ! »</span><br> </div> <div class="col m-4 auteur pull-right"> <div class="inner"> <div class="white"> <a class="switch">Text</a><br> <b>Caroline Bourgeois</b><br> <span style="display: none;"> Curator of the exhibition </span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="clear"><br><br><br></div> <span class="alinea"></span> The Couvent des Jacobins—a historic monument, classified as such since 1991—was founded in the sixteenth century, then turned over to the army in 1793; the army handed over the building to the city of Rennes in 2002. The former convent was recently renovated by the architect Jean Guervilly and converted into a convention center. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span> The Musée des Beaux-Arts was created in the wake of the French Revolution, in 1794; its collection at the time was composed of works seized from the city’s religious and civic buildings. With Anne Dary at its helm since 2013, the Musée des Beaux-Arts of Rennes now houses a collection of works from different eras, spanning from Antiquity to today. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span> Within these two institutions, the Pinault Collection presents the exhibition “Stand up!”, its name resonating like a clarion call. In the works presented at the Couvent des Jacobins, artists convey their reflections on the jumps and leaps of History, but also on the ways in which various trials and tribulations we have each experienced have impacted our lives. Works on display refer, in a more metaphysical way, to the notion of fate. The exhibition will offer visitors the opportunity to examine and question their ability to “stand up!” when confronted with challenges and hardships. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span> These works also evoke Man’s individual and shared destiny. Each one was produced in response to an event that has changed the course of a life or of humanity; each one invites the visitor to consider the reality it depicts from a distance. Faced with these works, we realize that it is always possible to stand up and face adversity, to act, and even at times, perhaps, to develop our sense of humor. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span> The exhibition begins by examining current issues—immigration, work conditions, even colonization. A group of sculptures then refers to various historical moments of the twentieth century, in particular the history of warfare. These works encourage us to ask ourselves: what have we learned from the past? Are we now in control of our own fates? <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span> In the historic section of the Couvent des Jacobins, we go further back in time, to consider works whose central theme is the violence perpetrated by mankind and the cyclical nature of history. These works also examine multiculturalism and its benefits. The final works in this section deal with death and mankind’s inevitable end. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span> As a counterpoint, Tatiana Trouvé has created an installation for the Musée des Beaux-Arts that centers on her drawings from the series “Les dessouvenus” [The unremembered], a Breton expression referring to people suffering from memory loss. Trouvé evokes our individual “infirmities” here; she encourages us to enter into a “forest of signs.” For Trouvé, drawing is a means of returning to a place of reflection, as well as a space in which to project her thoughts. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span> If the premise of “Stand Up!” could be summed up in a sentence, it would evoke Hannah Arendt, according to whom each human can act as barbarian if he stops thinking. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span> Two new works were created for this exhibition: at the Couvent des Jacobins, Vincent Gicquel’s latest series of paintings; and at the Musée des Beaux-Arts of Rennes, Tatiana Trouvé’s site-specific installation. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span> These works span various media—sculpture, video, and painting. Several generations of artists are represented, some famous and others lesser known. <br><br><br> <b>Exhibited artists :</b><br> — Adel Abdessemed<br> — Lucas Arruda<br> — Berlinde de Bruyckere<br> — Maurizio Cattelan<br> — Jake et Dinos Chapman<br> — François Curlet<br> — Marlene Dumas<br> — Vincent Gicquel<br> — Duane Hanson<br> — Thomas Houseago<br> — Pierre Huyghe<br> — Bertrand Lavier<br> — Jean-Luc Moulène<br> — Paulo Nazareth<br> — Charles Ray<br> — Thomas Schütte<br> — Henri Taylor<br> — Tatiana Trouvé<br> — Dario Villalba<br> — Danh Võ<br> <br><br> <br><br><br>
 
Paulo NAZARETH <br><i>Cadernos de Africa,</i> 2014 <br>15 piles of 1,000 black-and-white newsprints on light paper, six presented on makeshift tables, and two metal cans
Thomas HOUSEAGO <br><i>Baby,</i> 2009-2010 <br>Tuf-Cal, hemp, iron rebar, wood, graphite, charcoal
Charles RAY <br><i>Boy with Frog,</i> 2009 <br>Cast stainless steel with acrylic polyurethane <br>247 × 91 × 96,5 cm <br> <br>Exhibtion view, <br>Kunstmuseum Basel, 2014
 
Vincent GICQUEL <br><i>Pédoncule,</i> 2017 <br>Oil on canvas <br>190 × 140 cm
 
Marlene DUMAS <br><i>Long Life,</i> 2002 <br>Oil on canvas <br>80 × 70 cm
Tatiana TROUVÉ <br><i>Untitled,</i> 2013 <br>[série « Les dessouvenus »] <br>Pencil on paper mounted on canvas, bleach, cork, copper <br>153 × 240 × 3.5 cm
Tatiana TROUVÉ <br><i>Untitled,</i> 2017 <br>[série « Les dessouvenus »] <br>Pencil on paper mounted on canvas, bleach <br>153 × 240 × 3.5 cm
Lynette YIADOM-BOAKYE <br><i>Resurrect the Oracle,</i> 2015 <br>Oil on canvas <br>241,3 × 198,1 × 2,5 cm
 
Lucas ARRUDA <br><i>Untitled,</i> 2016 <br>Oil on canvas <br>30 × 37 cm
 

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