Teresa
Burga
Laura
Owens
David
Hammons
Huang
Yong
Ping
Rachel
Whiteread
John
Baldessari
 
John BALDESSARI <br><i>Two Triangles with Spheres,</i> 1984 <br>Black-and-white photographs <br>67,3 × 101,6 cm et 70 × 101 cm
<div class="col m-12"> <b>John BALDESSARI</b><br /> Museo Jumex / Mexico </div> <div class="clear"><br></div> <span class="alinea"></span>John Baldessari (b. 1931 in California) is widely considered to be one of the most influential artists of the second half of the twentieth century, celebrated for an approach to conceptual art that is both intellectually rigorous and irreverent. Borrowing from various sources (such as films, TV shows, and advertising) referring to a vast field of iconographic references, he prompts the viewer to examine the relationships between language and images. Baldessari has created photographs, collages, paintings, and films in his ongoing examination of the codes of cultural communication. This is the first time that a Latin American museum will present a large-scale exhibition, including over eighty works, by Baldessari. <br><br><br>
 
Laura OWENS <br><i>Untitled,</i> 2006 <br>Acrylic and oil on linen <br>213,4 × 243,8 cm
<div class="col m-12"> <b>Laura OWENS</b><br /> The whitney museum / New York <br /> Dallas museum of art<br /> The museum of contemporary / Los Angeles </div> <div class="clear"><br></div> <span class="alinea"></span>This mid-career survey of the work of Laura Owens (b. 1970, lives and works in Los Angeles), which will travel to New York, Dallas, and Los Angeles, is the most comprehensive presentation of her work to date. The exhibition will highlight the different facets of the artist’s practice, showing how she has explored eclectic methods and techniques and turned to a wide range of references. At the start of her career, Owens was inspired by traditional Chinese and Japanese painting, modernist masters (and, in particular, the work of Le Douanier Rousseau), and artisanal embroidery. She has on occasion reinterpreted masterpieces of art history, in this case the eleventh-century Bayeux tapestry. <br><br>
 
David HAMMONS <br><i>Phat Free,</i> 1995-2000 <br>Color video transferred to DVD, poem
<div class="col m-12"> <b>David HAMMONS</b><br /> Biennale of urbanism & architecture / Shenzhen

Since the seventees, David Hammons (b. 1943 in Illinois) has been a discreet presence in the art world; through his oblique use of materials, he transforms everyday objects into allegories of the experience of the outsider in the contemporary world, whether an artist, a stranger, a madman, or, most persistently, a person of color. In <i>Phat Free</i>, we see Hammons walking along a Harlem street at night, kicking a metal bucket ahead of him. The use of found objects, often culled from the streets of New York, recurs throughout his work; we could mention, for instance, the snowballs he sold for his work <i>Bliz-aard Ball Sale</i> (1983). The loud metallic sound of Hammons kicking the bucket sarcastically emphasizes the lack of an actual ball, a compelling metaphor for the contemporary black urban experience. <br><br>
 
Rachel WHITEREAD <br><i>Untitled (One Hundred Spaces),</i> 1995 <br>Resin, 100 units <br>Variable dimensions
<div class="col m-12"> <b>Rachel WHITEREAD</b><br /> Tate britain / london </div> <div class="clear"><br></div> <span class="alinea"></span>Rachel Whiteread (b. 1963 in London) was awarded the Turner Prize in 1993, the year she created House, a fullscale cast of the interior of a house slated for demolition. A key work in the artist’s career, it was to be destroyed a few months after its construction. Since then, Whiteread has continued to create, almost exclusively, casts of existing spaces. In 1995, she combined casts of the underside of over 100 found chairs in colored resin in her installation <i>Untitled (One Hundred Spaces),</i> pointing out the voids at the heart of the familiar objects that surround us in our daily lives. The sculpture is rich in references: it follows the precedent of Bruce Nauman’s <i>Cast of the Space Under My Chair</i> (1965–68), while also evoking the alignment of megalithic standing stones, giving the installation a sacred dimension. <br><br>
 
Teresa BURGA <br><i>Untitled (One Hundred Spaces),</i> 1967 <br>Mixed media <br>80 × 108 × 208 cm (bed) <br>383 × 280 cm (curtain)
<div class="col m-12"> <b>Teresa BURGA</b><br /> Migros museum für gegenwartskunst / Zurich </div> <div class="clear"><br></div> <span class="alinea"></span>From 1966 to 1967, Theresa Burga (born in Peru in 1935), a member of the avant-garde group Arte Nuevo, took part in a sociological study on the roles and lifestyles of middle-class women in patriarchal Peru. She advocated for a more direct representation of desire and sexuality and the awakening of a radical female consciousness, contributing in this way to the feminist political debate in her native country. Her work <i>Untitled,</i> 1967, will be on loan to the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst in Zurich during her retrospective. <br><br>
 
Huang Yong PING <br><i>Caverne,</i> 2009 <br>Installation, cave in resin, sculptures of Buddha and Taliban, shadows of bats <br>Variable dimensions
<div class="col m-12"> <b>Huang YONG PING</b><br /> Villa getty / Los Angeles </div> <div class="clear"><br></div> <span class="alinea"></span>Since settling in France in 1990, Huang Yong Ping (b. 1954 in China) has combined Eastern and Western philosophies and belief systems in his work. In 2009, he took up Plato’s allegory of the cave: with <i>Caverne,</i> the audience first confronts a huge grey mass, similar to a meteorite; then, by peering through a peephole in the wall supporting the scupture, they can look inside the cavity, where a group of Buddhas and members of the Taliban sit together, facing the bare walls of the cavern opposite, on which the shadows of bats dance. Playing on the elements of Plato’s myth, the artist also refers to the tragic destruction of the Buddhas of Bamiyan in Afghanistan in 2001. <br><br>
 

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