TEATRINO
 
Séminaire
Projeter / Exposer
 
Peter Sloterdijk
 
 
<div class="chapeau">PETER SLOTERDIJK, ONE OF THE BEST KNOWN AND WIDELY READ GERMAN INTELLECTUALS WORKING TODAY, WAS INVITED TO GIVE A TALK ON CONTEMPORARY ART AT THE TEATRINO, USING DAMIEN HIRST’S EXHIBITION AS A STARTING POINT FOR HIS REFLECTION.</div> <br> <br> <div class="col m-10"> <span class="title">PETER</span><br> <span class="title">SLOTERDIJK</span> </div> <div class="col m-4 auteur pull-right"> <div class="inner"> <div class="white"> <a class="switch">Text</a><br> <b>Stefano Vastano</b><br> <span style="display: none;"> Journalist for <i>L’Espresso</i> in Berlin </span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="clear"><br><br><br></div> <span class="alinea"></span> On the morning of November 17, as he made his way to the Teatrino for his lecture, Peter Sloterdijk paused to take in Damien Hirst’s <i>The Fate of a Banished Man</i>, a bronze sculpture installed in front of Palazzo Grassi—“it’s a Surrealist scene,” he quipped. Then, as he crossed <i>Demon with Bowl</i> in Palazzo Grassi’s courtyard, he was reminded of the review <i>Acéphale,</i> created by Georges Bataille. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span> According to Sloterdijk, Hirst’s exhibition is a journey into the sources of modern art. “With this exhibition,” he explains, “Hirst points out the three fundamental foundations of modernity.” The first is (German) Romanticism, referred to even in the exhibition’s title itself: “a love of shipwrecks,” he explains, “and an attraction toward ruins.” The second is the brutal, shocking esthetic typically associated with Surrealism—the difference being, he adds, “that in our current era, when art has taken on so many different appearances, it’s thanks to their beauty that Hirst’s works manage to shock the viewer.” This heady mix of Romantic ruins, Surrealist energy, and the appearance of an (unlikely) classicism evokes for Sloterdijk of a third foundation: <i>Nietzsche contra Wagner,</i> in which Nietzsche rose up against the decadence of Wagner’s work. The rooms of Palazzo Grassi resonate, explains Sloterdijk, with echoes of what Nietzsche identified as the source of Wagner’s decadence, “the three great stimulants of an exhausted people: brutality, artificiality, and innocence.” <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span> This “innocence” is not, as in Dostoyevsky’s <i>The Idiot,</i> a false innocence, but rather a refined counterfeit of the myths of mass culture and mass consumption—look around and you’ll find Mickey Mouse, Mowgli, and some Transfomers—recovered and re-exposed among models of more ancient mythologies. “Hirst’s is an eclectic Renaissance, one that has an immediate impact on the viewer’s retina that is both playful and serious at once,” adds the German philosopher. Marcel Duchamp was wrong when he affirmed that art could no longer have a “retinal” effect. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span> Looking beyond Duchamp’s morose prophecy, “we witness here,” Sloterdijk concludes, “the revenge of a twenty-first-century artist on his audience and on the history of art.” Naturally, it isn’t a coincidence that Hirst wanted to established a game between the majestic rooms of Palazzo Grassi and the treasures of a lagoon, now almost submerged. <br><br>
 
<div class="chapeau">“PROJECTING/DISPLAYING. THE WORK OF ART IN THE AGE OF ITS REMEDIATION” WAS A THREE-DAY SEMINAR DEDICATED TO FILMS, HELD IN JANUARY 2018 AT THE TEATRINO. IN THEIR TALKS, ARTISTS, ART HISTORIANS, AND CURATORS EXAMINED QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO THE DISPLAY AND EXPERIENCE OF WORKS IN DIFFERENT MEDIUMS IN THE MUSEUM.</div> <br> <br> <div class="col m-10"> <span class="title">Séminaire</span><br><br> <span class="title">Projeter / Exposer :</span> </div> <br><br><br> <div class="col m-10 pull-left align-left"> <span class="lieu">L'oeuvre d'art à l'époque</span><br> <span class="lieu">de sa rémédiation</span> </div> <br> <div class="col m-4 auteur pull-right"> <div class="inner"> <div class="white"> <a class="switch">Text</a><br> <b>Angela Mengoni</b><br> <span style="display: none;"> Professor of Semiotics, Philosophy and Theory of Languages,<br> IUAV University, Venice </span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="clear"><br><br><br></div> <span class="alinea"></span> Visitors who dropped by the Teatrino at Palazzo Grassi during the three-day program “Projecting/ Displaying: The Work of Art in the Era of its Remediation” this January 2018 were probably surprised to find the metallic machinery of a 16-mm-film projector installed among the seats and, even more, to discover that the voice-over narration of a 1947 classic “film on art” about Carpaccio’s paintings was paired, onscreen, with close-ups of ingurgitating tongues filmed by Lygia Pape in 1975 <i>(Eat me: a gula au a luxúria?)</i>. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span> The deconstruction of a merely thematic and selfevident definition of the art/film relationship was actually at the core of the research project hosted at the Teatrino, devoted to exploring film as a place of legibility for the operations of the work of art and its display, rather than the work of art as object of filming.<sup>1</sup> Such a perspective demands the collective experience of a shared vision, devoting great care to the technical specificities of the display itself, rather than the chiefly logocentric model of the conference lecture: the visual experience is not here the object of a merely theoretical interpretation to come, but a form of interpretation carried out by the objects themselves through their own means. Precisely what the late Hubert Damisch would call a <i>theoretical object</i>. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span> Faithful to the display history evoked by its name, the Teatrino became, during those afternoons, an experimental laboratory in which different forms of visual and conceptual thought alchemically reacted with one another: scholarly papers, digital and 16-mm projections, as well as lectures by artists Pierre Leguillon, Rosalind Nashashibi and Lucy Skaer, and Mathieu Copeland and Philippe Decrauzat. This alchemical reaction outlined the way in which, through their mutual remediation, the film and the work of art reflect on the operations that govern their regimes of visibility and critically examine the conditions of representation itself. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span> Michael Snow’s oblique filming, revealing the material support of his own canvasses <i>(Side Seat Paintings Slides Sound Film,</i> 1970); the nocturnal flashes perceptually intensifying the light that allows the objects to appear in the museum <i>(Flash in the Metropolitan</i> by Rosalind Nashashibi and Lucy Skaer, 2006); the naturalized devices of the conference display, reappearing in the archeological gesture of hanging posters and supporting a narrative <i>(Diane, Ad et Tupperware. An autobiographic conference,</i> performative lecture by Pierre Leguillon); the forgotten surfaces of inscription of both the canvas and the film reaffirming their opacity <i>(A Personal Sonic Geology,</i> exhibition project by Mathieu Copeland and Philippe Decrauzat, 2015); the topological exploration of the limits of the medium running through film and installation (Lygia Pape, <i>Favela da Maré,</i> 1972; <i>Eat-Me,</i> 1975; <i>Catiti-Catiti na terra dos brasis,</i> 1978); the reaffirmation of a material intermediary between the filmic experience and the object or space it seizes (Paul Sietsema, <i>Empire,</i> 2002): these meditations on the supports of the display experience were beautifully intensified, now and then, by the sudden transformation of the conference room into the dark space of the analog film experience, crossed by the mechanic sound and the dusty conic light of the projection. <br><br> <div class="notes"> 1 — The project, coordinated by the Film department of the Centre Pompidou and the Centre d’histoire et théorie des arts at EHESS Paris, in association with Iuav University of Venice, was supported by the “Labex CAP - Création, Arts, Patrimoines”, the French laboratoire d’excellence that calls for a renewed reflection on creativity and heritage through joint research projects between universities and museums. <br><br> <b>Scientific board :</b> Enrico Camporesi (Labex CAP), Giovanni Careri (EHESS, Paris / Iuav Venice), Carmelo Marabello (IUAV, Venise), Angela Mengoni (IUAV, Venise), Philippe-Alain Michaud (Centre Pompidou), Jonathan Pouthier (Centre Pompidou) • <b>With :</b> Lena Bader (DFK, Paris), Érik Bullot (ENSA, Bourges), Enrico Camporesi (Labex CAP), Mathieu Copeland, Philippe Decrauzat, Eric De Bruyn (Freie Universität Berlin), Lydie Delahaye (Université Paris 8), Pierre Leguillon (HEAD, Genève), Rosalind Nashashibi et Lucy Skaer. </div> <div><br> <br> <br> </div>
 

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