Two exhibitions of Claire Tabouret’s work will be presented during the seventy-second edition of the Festival d’Avignon (whose poster she also designed), at the Eglise des Célestins and the Collection Lambert. They will include three works from the Pinault Collection.


<br> <div class="col m-12 pull-right align-right"> <span class="lieu">Collection Lambert / Avignon</span> </div> <br><br><br><br><br> <div class="col m-10"> <span class="title">Claire Tabouret</span><br> </div> <div class="col m-4 auteur pull-right noclick"> <div class="inner"> <div class="white"> <a class="switch">Text</a><br> <b>Caroline Bourgeois</b><br> </div> </div> </div> <div class="clear"><br><br><br></div> <span class="alinea"></span>Claire Tabouret was born in 1981; the first gallery exhibition of her figurative paintings took place in 2010. Today, she is still at an early stage in her career. For painters (besides a few exceptional abstract or expressionist artists), achieving maturity requires time and reflection—something that can be hard to attain today, when everything moves at a frenetic pace. Rather than opting to remain in France, satisfied with her burgeoning success, Tabouret decided, in 2015, to relocate to Los Angeles, with the goal of reexamining her work and expanding her horizons in this new environment. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>When asked which of her many predecessors in the art of portraiture have influenced her work, Tabouret immediately names Théodore Géricault (1791–1824) and Marlene Dumas (b. 1953), describing the inspiring intensity of the work of this South-African artist, and of the importance she places on drawing and draftsmanship. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>Encountering the fixed gazes of the characters she depicts, we are compelled to stare back; we might have the uncanny sensation—a feeling of disquiet, to reprise the term used by Portuguese poet Fernando Pessoa (1888–1935)—of being watched ourselves. Claire Tabouret examines the question of an individual’s fate within a society or a community, and in doing so, is compelled to adopt a position. She takes risks with color, with figures, with their position and with that of the viewer. Their eyes stare back at us, asking questions of themselves and to us. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>Her joyfully ambiguous play on makeup is a means by which to examine painting and color; it also evokes the gaze, seduction, the role of women, of sexuality. The makeup is always flawed, implying a critical distance from classical notions of beauty. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>With these works, Claire Tabouret depicts the presence of women, of those who follow their own rules, who are warriors. Tabouret’s intimate and solitary work captures a conviction that is emerging more and more forcefully each day of late, across the world: the time for superwomen has come.
 
<i>La Grande camisole 2</i>, 2014<br> —<br> Acrylic on canvas<br> 230 × 330 cm<br>
<i>Les Veilleurs</i>, 2014<br> —<br> Acrylic on canvas<br> 230 × 400 cm<br>
<i>Sitting</i>, 2016<br> —<br> Acrylic on canvas<br> 230 × 300 cm<br>
 

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Pinault Collection Magazine - Issue #11

 

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