Tatiana Trouvé


<div class="col m-4 auteur pull-right"> <div class="inner"> <div class="white"> <a class="switch">Text</a><br> <b>Florence Ostende</b><br> <span style="display: none;"> Curator<br> Barbican Centre, London </span> </div> </div> </div> <br/> <br/> <br/> <br/> <br/> <span class="alinea"></span>The large drawings presented by Tatiana Trouvé on the patio of the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Rennes are suspended from metal structures, designed by the artist for the museum’s patio. The installation imposes a circulation path through the wide and sunny space. Several sculptures, strewn across the floor, include elements also depicted in the drawings: slings and straps, metal tubes, various construction materials. As they move through the space, visitors become aware of the contrast between these two types of representation: the imaginary landscapes, drawn in pencil, that float above the ground, and the heavy, physical objects, in bronze, aluminum, wood, and stone, that seem to have escaped from the canvases to land on the floor. The exhibition consists of the exchange between these two worlds, this limbo. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>The ten drawings presented in this installation are part of the series “Les Dessouvenus” (“The Unremembered”), which Trouvé began in 2013. To create these works, she immersed large sheets of paper in a bath of bleach, which altered their colors, creating the stains at the basis of her compositions. In less than a minute, black becomes burgundy, grey turns to yellow, brown adopts a sepia tinge. On a sheet of pink paper, the bleach created a diluted shape that resembles an atomic mushroom cloud and inspired Trouvé to draw a tree. The resulting drawing evokes the symmetrical stains of a Rorschach test. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>Trouvé compares her process to the ancient practice of coffee-cup reading, or divining the future by scrutinizing the shapes left by coffee grounds at the bottom of a cup, and to radiography, which uses x-rays to create an image that cannot be seen by the naked eye. Occult practices, such as magnetism and spiritualism, were at their apogee in the nineteenth century, when early photography was thought to capture the presence of spirits invisible to the naked eye on paper. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>The drawings in this series are inspired by a number of different sources, each related to the labor of memory. The “dessouvenus” of the series’ title is a Breton expression, used to refer to people who have lost their memories. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>For many years, Trouvé has been adding to her dream journal, as well as to a growing archive of photographs, kept in her studio. To recreate the spaces envisioned in her dreams, she turns to her archive of images, organized alphabetically and thematically: algorithm, algae, bas-relief, crate, frame, rail, shoe, tarp, tree, etc. Her collection of images of trees is especially present in this selection of drawings. It includes many pictures of trees uprooted by recent storms, as well as of trees from her childhood, when she lived in Senegal. Her fascination with the study of trees—a field called dendrology—increased when she encountered the book <i>The Hidden Life of Trees</i> (2015) by Peter Wohlleben, in which the German author and forest engineer describes the memory of plants and the way in which they communicate by emitting electric signals. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>Exhibition views are another important source for this series, in which earlier works by Trouvé reappear. Trouvé regularly photographs her exhibitions during their installation and dismantling, focusing on those transitional moments. In that uncertain, ambiguous space, her works commingle with piles of wooden planks and pallets. The incoherent scale and false vanishing lines of her drawings induce a speculative state, a psychic architecture.
Born in 1968, in Italy; lives and works in Paris.
From the series <i>« Les Dessouvenus »</i>, 2013-2017<br> —<br> Exhibition views<br> Musée des beaux-arts, Rennes<br>
From the series <i>« Les Dessouvenus »</i>, 2013-2017<br> —<br> Exhibition views<br> Musée des beaux-arts, Rennes<br>
From the series <i>« Les Dessouvenus »</i>, 2013-2017<br> —<br> Exhibition views<br> Musée des beaux-arts, Rennes<br>
 

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