Antoni Clavé
Musée d’art
Hyacinthe Rigaud / Perpignan
Henrik Olesen
Museo nacional
centro de arte Reina Sofía / Madrid
Jean-Michel Basquiat
THE Brant Foundation /
NEW YORK
« Irving Penn.
untroubled »
Mina Image Centre / Beyrouth
Shen Yuan
Power Station
of Art / Shanghai
Hiroshi Sugimoto
Fondation de l’Hermitage / Lausanne
Thomas Houseago
Musée d’art moderne de la ville de paris
 
<i>Colors of Shadow</i> <br/><i>C1032</i>, 2006 <br/>  — <br/>Pigment print <br/>135 × 106 cm
Hiroshi Sugimoto
Fondation de l’Hermitage / Lausanne

<span class="alinea"></span>Colors of Shadow is the first series photographed entirely in color by Hiroshi Sugimoto (born in 1948 in Japan, lives and works in New York). Sugimoto designed the interior of an apartment, coating its walls with Shikkui, a traditional Japanese plaster that absorbs and reflects light uniformly, so that he could study the nature of shadows and capture the subtle play of light on surface. The white walls of the white cube in which works of art are typically hung become the works themselves. The Pinault Collection will be contributing two works from the series to the exhibition “Shadows: from the Renaissance to Today” at the Hermitage Foundation in Lausanne during summer 2019. <b>L.E.</b>
<i>Colors of Shadow</i> <br/><i>C1029</i>, 2006 <br/>  — <br/>Pigment print <br/>135 × 106 cm
 
<i>Untitled #05,</i> 2011 <br/>  — <br/> Screws, nails, canvas <br/> 165 × 165 cm
Henrik Olesen
Museo nacional centro de arte Reina Sofía / Madrid

<span class="alinea"></span>The works of Henrik Olesen, born in Denmark in 1967, center on, in the artist’s own words, “the body as multiplied and sexualized. It’s all about constructing a postmodern body.” The body as enslaved by structures of political or sexual domination, oppressed by heteronormative familial, social, and cultural norms. The body transposed in “portraits” created from everyday objects: silverware, a shoe, a cigar, a pair of pants on a hanger, or even pieces of wood. These screws are the basic elements—polysemic and minimal—that constitute the three works in the Pinault Collection, exhibited in 2015 in the exhibition “Slip of the Tongue.” Glued haphazardly on three large canvases, isolated or in rhythmic groups, straight or crooked, they constitute a kind of mute poem, a coded message, a musical score—or rather, lines of computer code that have abandoned the disembodied digital world to enter the dirty, emotional, trivial, physical, living world of the body. <b>M.B.</b>
 
<i>Bottle Head</i>, 2010 <br/>  — <br/> Tuf-cal, hemp, steel bar <br/> 195,6 × 99 × 94 cm
Thomas Houseago
Musée d’art moderne de la ville de Paris

<span class="alinea"></span>Using materials such as wood, plaster, metal, concrete, and bronze, Thomas Houseago (born in Leeds in 1972, lives and works in Los Angeles since 2003) “continues an exploration initiated by sculptors, such as Henry Moore and George Baselitz, who focus on creating living incarnations of the human figure in space,” explains curator Olivia Gaultier-Jeanroy. “His sculptures, though often monumental in size, bear the visible trace of their fabrication process, wavering between strength and fragility.” Three works from the Pinault Collection are included in the artist’s first exhibition in a Paris museum: <i>L’Homme Pressé, Bottle Head,</i> and <i>Giant Mask</i>. The last one was previously shown in Rennes in summer 2018, as part of the exhibition “Debout!”. <b>L.E.</b>
 
<i>Assemblage en Bleu</i>, 1975 <br/>  — <br/> Paint and collage on canvas <br/> 162 × 130 cm
Antoni Clavé
Musée d’art Hyacinthe Rigaud / Perpignan

<span class="alinea"></span>The retrospective “Clavé. Sur le front de l’art” illustrates the evolution of the work of Antoni Clavé (born in Barcelona in 1913, died in Saint-Tropez in 2005), from the first movie posters he designed in Catalonia, sketches made during the Spanish War and in jail in Perpignan, to paintings, sculptures, and theater sets he created in Paris, and including the engravings, lithographs of crumpled papers, and large-format paintings he made once he had settled in the South of France. The two works on loan from the Pinault Collection are emblematic of his series of object-assemblages from the 1960s. Inaugurated in 2011, the museum devoted to Antoni Clavé, located near Tokyo, was designed by Tadao Ando. <b>L.E</b>
 
<i>Untitled (Head of a Madman)</i>, 1982 <br/>  — <br/> Oilstick on paper, mounted on linen <br/> 109,2 × 78,1 cm
Jean-Michel Basquiat
The Brant Foundation / New York

<span class="alinea"></span>The Brant Foundation was founded in 1996 by American businessman Peter Brant with a mission to promote education and appreciation of contemporary art. Works in the collection are presented to the public in its Greenwich, Connecticut museum. In March 2019, the Foundation will inaugurate a new exhibition space, located in New York’s East Village, with an exhibition of works by Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960-1988). Basquiat first achieved fame as a graffiti artist before beginning to paint on canvas. His unique style, combining elements of pop culture with wide-ranging references, from voodoo to jazz, was soon noticed, including by Andy Warhol, who became his friend and collaborator, solidifying Basquiat’s status as an important New York figure and soon an established, successful artist. <b>L.E</b>
 
<i>Poïkilotherme</i>, 2008 <br/>  — <br/> Murano glass thermometer, water, koï <br/> 302 × 18 × 22 cm
Shen Yuan
Power Station of Art / Shanghai

<span class="alinea"></span>From August to October 2018, Shanghai’s Power Station of Art presented an exhibition that strove to establish a dialogue among the works of two militant artists who, across different eras, cultures, and media, share the same activist stance. Niki de Saint Phalle (1930–2002), a French-American sculptor and celebrated member of the Nouveaux Réalistes, known for her Nana statues, a sisterhood of voluptuous, proud women, was brought together with avant-garde installation artist and sculptor Shen Yuan (born in China in 1959). Yuan’s installations, marked by the melancholy of exile (she emigrated to Paris in 1990), often constitute a mordant critique of Chinese society. The title of this work, on loan from the Pinault Collection, refers to animals whose body temperature varies with that of their environment. <b>L.E</b>
 
<i>Still Life with Watermelon</i>, New York, 1947 [1985] <br/>  — <br/> Dye-Transfer print <br/> 55,9 × 44,5 cm
« Irving Penn. untroubled »
Mina Image CentRE / Beyrouth

<span class="alinea"></span>Beirut’s Mina Image Centre is a new exhibition space dedicated to Middle Eastern and international photography. For its inaugural show, it is presenting an important selection of photographs by Irving Penn (American, 1917–2007)—his first exhibition in the Arab world. Curated by Matthieu Humery, “Untroubled” is a fresh interpretation of the exhibition “Resonance,” presented at Palazzo Grassi in 2014 and Fotografiska in Stockholm in 2017. This is the eleventh exhibitions of works from the Pinault Collection to take place outside of its museums. <b>L.E</b>
 

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