Palazzo Grassi invited Kenneth Goldsmith (born in 1961 in the United States), artist, poet, essayist, and founder of Ubuweb, to participate in a conversation with curatorial duo Francesco Urbano Ragazzi at the Teatrino.


05-palazzo-punta-teatrino.06-kenneth-goldsmith.exhibitions
<u>Text</u> <br/> <b>Francesco Urbano Ragazzib</b> <br/> <span style="display:none;">Curatorial duo</span>






<span class="alinea"></span>A hacktivist on trial for disseminating millions of academic essays belonging to the online archive site JSTOR, who killed himself during that trial, in 2013. A former senator who has (at least for the time being) failed in her attempt to become the first female President of the United States. A philosopher who, at the age of twenty-nine, declared that he had solved—or even dissolved—all the problems raised in philosophy… What could Aaron Swartz, Hillary Clinton, and Ludwig Wittgenstein have in common? Perhaps a certain connection to the power, but also to the limits, of language. At least, that is the answer put forward by the artist and poet Kenneth Goldsmith. <br/> <br/> <span class="alinea"></span>But it is more likely that the actual common denominator among these three figures is Kenneth Goldsmith himself. <br/> <br/> <span class="alinea"></span>Indeed, if we enter “Swartz,” “Clinton,” and “Wittgenstein” in any search engine, we discover that these three figures are the subjects of a monumental archive-based project, developed by the author of <i>Uncreative Writing and Wasting Time on the Internet</i>. <br/> <br/> <span class="alinea"></span><i>Printing out the Internet</i> consists of all the documents that Swartz made available to everyone, at the cost of his own freedom. It is an ocean of leaflets that stands as a monument to the uncontrollable circulation of knowledge (Labor, Mexico City, 2013; Kunsthalle Düsseldorf and Kunstverein Hamburg, 2014). <br/> <br/> <span class="alinea"></span><i>HILLARY: The Hillary Clinton Emails</i>, also consists of a slightly smaller number of printed sheets of paper: the 30,000 emails that Hillary Clinton recklessly sent and received from her home address between 2009 and 2013. These messages, broadcast on the Internet by the US Department of State, then by WikiLeaks, were “materialized” by Goldsmith during an exhibition that will remain open throughout the Venice Biennale inside the Despar Teatro Italia store, a former movie theater, covered with frescos, dating from the early twentieth century, recently converted into a supermarket. <br/> <br/> <span class="alinea"></span>Finally, there is a book—<i>I Declare a Permanent State of Happiness</i>—and a lecture that Goldsmith will present at Palazzo Grassi’s Teatrino on November 27 at 6:30 p.m. The crystalline structure of Wittgenstein’s <i>Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus</i> is crowded with footnotes that seem to be the brainchild of a very intelligent and lazy student, who would love Nina Simone, Lou Reed, and John Cage. Hillary and Aaron will also be present, in one way or another.
“Hillary. Kenneth Goldsmith” exhibition view at the Despar Teatro Italia, Venice.
“Hillary. Kenneth Goldsmith” exhibition view at the Despar Teatro Italia, Venice.
“Hillary. Kenneth Goldsmith” exhibition view at the Despar Teatro Italia, Venice.
“Hillary. Kenneth Goldsmith” exhibition view at the Despar Teatro Italia, Venice.
 

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