CONCEIVED BY SUSANNE FRANCO, “MUOVITI MUOVITI! DANCE, MUSIC, PERFORMANCE” IS A CELEBRATION OF THE CULTURE OF THE DANCE THROUGH TRANSMISSION OF CHOREOGRAPHIC WORKS, THE REPRESENTATION OF LIVE PERFORMANCES, AND THE SCREENING OF ARCHIVAL FILMS, WITH COMMENTARY BY ARTISTS AND SPECIALISTS. AS PART OF THIS SERIES, MASTERCLASSES OF TWO WORKS BY TRISHA BROWN WERE TAUGHT AT THE TEATRINO: SOLO OLOS (1976), WITH CHOREOGRAPHER ABIGAIL YAGER, IN JUNE 2018, AND TRIO A (1966), WITH CHOREOGRAPHER SARA WOOKEY, IN MAY 2019.


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<u>Text</u> <br/> <b>Sara Wookey</b> <br/> <span style="display:none;">Choregrapher artist</span>




<span class="alinea"></span><i>Trio A</i>, a dance by postmodern choreographer and filmmaker Yvonne Rainer, first premiered in January 1966 at the Judson Memorial Church in New York City. It was part of a larger work of Rainer’s entitled <i>The Mind is a Muscle</i>, created at the Judson Dance Theater: a collective of dancers and visual artists interested in exploring cross-disciplinary practices and challenging ideas of dance and performance. This group of artists created experimental work that did not, at the time, fit easily into the more mainstream programming of theater. And, because of that, they sought out alternative work spaces and venues. Working out of the basement of a church in Greenwich Village meant they were creating works that did not depend on a proscenium stage and invited a more intimate environment in which to view dance. <br/> <br/> <span class="alinea"></span>As one of only five dance artists to be certified by Rainer to transmit <i>Trio A</i> to others, I am tasked with carrying forth her dance and the values therein. A dance created over fifty years ago requires a diligence and attention to detail in order to preserve such a complex and rigorous work. <br/> <br/> <span class="alinea"></span>It is wonderfully fitting that, for <i>Muoviti, Muoviti! [Move On Up!]</i>, I was invited to work with a group of exceptionally talented dance artists and in the Tadao Ando-designed foyer of the Teatrino at Palazzo Grassi. This naturally-lit, flexible space allowed for a studio-like environment to practice in and, for the presentation, a close encounter for the dancers and audience (as it might have felt being in the Judson Church basement space). The audience was able to enter into and become part of our practice, in a way that the more distanced constraints of a proscenium theater would not, otherwise, allow for. <br/> <br/> <span class="alinea"></span>It was here that the spirit of <i>Trio A</i>—its complex choreographic structures being played out by experienced dancers, but within the everydayness of gathering together in a room with people casually seated around the edges of the performing space—came through: a special quality of being (alone) together (dancing and watching), while a piece of contemporary dance lives on.
 

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Pinault Collection Magazine - Issue #13

 

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