<span class="chapeau">To mark its tenth anniversary, the Musée du Quai Branly is organizing the exhibition “Jacques Chirac and the dialogue of cultures,” a cultural portrait of the former president who played a key role in the museum's creation.</span><br><br> <div class="col m-4 auteur pull-left"> <div class="inner"> <div class="white"> <a class="switch">Texte</a><br> <b>Jean-Jacques Aillagon</b><br> <span>Former Minister, curator of the exhibition</span> </div> </div> </div><br> <br><br><br><br> <div class="col m-4"><span class="title">Adel</span><br><br> <span class="alinea"></span><span class="title">Abdessemed</span></div> <div class="col m-10 pull-right align-right"><span class="lieu">Musée du quai branly<br></span> <span class="lieu">Paris</span><br></div> <div class="clearfix"> <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>It should come as no surprise that the Pinault Collection, as well as Mr. And Mrs. Pinault themselves, appear among the lenders to the exhibition “Jacques Chirac and the dialogue of cultures.” The former president of the French Republic from 1995 to 2007, who was mayor of Paris from 1977 until his election to the presidency, has been a close friend of François Pinault’s for over forty years. As has often been noted, this friendship began when François Pinault, at the request of Jacques Chirac, rescued a joinery business in the Corrèze region. At the time, shortly before the creation of PPR (renamed Kering in 2013), the lumber trade was Pinault’s primary commercial activity. Both men had experienced, in their youth, the tough years of the Algerian war, which lastingly shaped their character and inspired in them the same hatred of violence. Thus fate brought together a man originating from the middle bourgeoisie, with a prestigious academic background—Louis-le-Grand, followed by Sciences Po and ENA—and another who, attached to the Brittany of his childhood, had left school at sixteen. Both would remain strongly committed to their land of origin, Chirac to the Corrèze of his ancestors, teachers, republicans, and freemasons; François Pinault to a Brittany traditionally torn between its devotion to the church and its love for the republic. This deeply rooted loyalty has never diminished their awareness of the world’s richness and variety, their conviction that its wholeness should never lead to its uniformity. Jacques Chirac’s strong engagement in initiating dialogue between different cultures, as well as the important role that he played in UNESCO, in the elaboration of its 2005 convention on the diversity of cultural expression, are a demonstration thereof. François Pinault demonstrated a similar conviction in collecting, then exhibiting, artworks by artists of different origins and from all over the world, with a particular sensitivity to the humanistic aspect and, sometimes, the protest expressed in their work. This appears very clearly in the work <i>Cri</i> by Adel Abdessemed, an artist from the Kabyle origin of northern Algeria, deeply steeped in French culture, who has become a major protagonist in the international art scene. His <i>Cry</i> expresses distress at large, the distress that erupts in horror. It is the cry that burst from little Kim Phuc’s throat when, as she fled in terror from the American napalm bombings at Trang Bang, Vietnam, she was captured on camera by Nick Ut, on June 8, 1972.<br><br> </div>
Adel ABDESSEMED<br /><i>Cri</i> — 2015 — Elephant ivory — 140 × 65 × 38 cm
 

Pinault Collection

Pinault Collection Magazine - Issue #06

 

Pinault Collection

Archives