PINAULT
COLLECTION
numéro 08
April
September 2017
 
<div style="text-align: right;"> <b>Jean-Jacques<br>Aillagon</b> </div> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <div> <span class="alinea"></span>Before beginning the renovations required to adapt the Bourse de Commerce into a museum, François Pinault wanted the building to be the subject of an extensive, in-depth historical and architectural study. Thus, Tadao Ando Architect & Associates, the architecture firm NeM / Lucie Niney et Thibault Marca Architectes, Pierre-Antoine Gatier’s agency, and SETEC Bâtiment engineers, to whom François Pinault has entrusted this great project, are now fully aware of the site’s prodigious history, which they will carefully preserve and protect. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span> The building, listed as a historic monument, houses two national landmarks: the famous column, a vestige of the former Hotel de Soissons belonging to Catherine de’ Medici, and the cupola with a structural-steel frame, designed in 1813 by François-Joseph Bélanger with the participation of a young architect, the German-born Jacques Ignace Hittorff, whose success in Paris would be considerable. In Cologne, Hittorff’s hometown, Pierre-Antoine Gatier, chief architect of French National Heritage, located an archive of drawings by the architect in the collection of the Wallraf-Richartz Museum, including sketches relating to the construction of the cupola of the Halle au Blé (Corn Exchange), the Bourse de Commerce’s predecessor. Thanks to an agreement between the Wallraf-Richartz Museum and the Pinault Collection, these sketches will be restored, then published and exhibited. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span> The interests and goals of preservation and architecture are not irreconcilable—despite what some pessimists may think. The implementation of work on the Bourse de Commerce is proof thereof. Here, designers and conservators work together to reinstate the quality of an exceptionally beautiful building, while introducing adjustments and equipment necessary for the site to function as a museum of contemporary art. This explains why the National Commission on National Heritage, having examined the plans and taken note of the considerable care and attention that their authors have paid to the advice of conservation experts, unanimously approved the project. Their consensus is an excellent omen at the start of this enterprise—and it will continue on the same path! </div>
 

Pinault Collection

Pinault Collection Magazine - Issue #08

 

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