<!-- ----- chapeau ------ --> <span class="chapeau">Created in 1985, the Biennial of Moving Images is one of Europe’s most prestigious events devoted to artist films and multimedia installations. A week after their presentation in Geneva, a selection of nine films was projected at Palazzo Grassi’s Teatrino from November 14 to 16, 2016. </span> <br> <br> <br> <!-- ----- auteur ------ --> <div class="col m-4 auteur pull-right noclick"> <div class="inner"> <div class="white"> <a class="switch">Text</a><br> <b>Caroline Bourgeois</b> </div> </div> </div> <br> <br> <br> <!-- ----- titre ------ --> <div class="col m-10"> <span class="title">Biennale de l’image en mouvement 2016</span> </div> <!-- ----- texte ------ --> <div class="clearfix"> <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>In 2014, when Geneva’s Centre d’Art Contemporain took over the organization of the Biennial of Moving Images, it decided to give the event an entirely original format: the Biennial exclusively presents works commissioned and produced for the event, which it finances or co-finances; those films then premiere during the weeklong event. The Biennial’s commissioners eschew choosing a theme, which grants artists more freedom to explore new avenues and choose different means of relying on and displaying images: installations, performances, films, etc. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>The 2016 edition of the Biennial brought together twenty-seven original works. It was directed by Andrea Bellini, Cecilia Alemani (High Line Art, New York), Elvira Dyangani Ose (Goldsmiths University, London, and Fondazione Prada), and myself. Each artist selected is entirely free to present whatever he or she chooses. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>This year, the works presented took on documentary, fictional, or plastic forms to examine various questions or comment on the relationship between gender and power. The selection of artists was truly international, such that visiting the Biennial conveyed the impression of traveling across the world. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>The selection from the Biennial that we presented in Venice, from November 14 to 16, 2016, was more narrow, given that we could only show works, of varying lengths, that could be screened for an audience in a theater, so a priori the more cinematographic projects. This selection reflected the quality of the Biennial as a whole: Yuri Ancarani (Milan), Alessio Di Zio (Los Angeles), Bodil Furu (Oslo), Jenna Hasse (Lisbon), Émilie Jouvet (Paris), Evangelia Kranioti (Paris), Boris Mitić (Belgrade), and Wu Tsang (Los Angeles) each suggests ways in which the cinematographic medium could possibly evolve in the future, and emphasize the variety of subjects that can be broached in a more narrative format. <br><br> <u>Anthropological</u>: Yuri Ankani observes customs in Qatar, capturing the often luxurious lifestyles of the inhabitants of this emirate, focusing in particular on falconry.<br> <u>Plastic</u>: Alessio Di Zio presents beautiful or mysterious, almost imaginary universes, in which viewers are invited to create their own dreams. <br> <u>Documentary</u>: Bodil Furu leads us into the postcolonial, now industrialized Democratic Republic of the Congo.<br> <u>Existential</u>: Jenna Hasse follows a couple caught in the typical struggles of human relationships. <br> <u>Motherhood/transmission of identities</u>: Émilie Jouvet, using only her smartphone camera, examines these themes in a very personal manner. <br> <u>Rituals</u>: Evangelia Kranioti shows us different expressions of the human body in the city of Rio de Janeiro. <br> <u>Humor</u>: Boris Mitić’s satirical documentary adopts a more literary angle, borrowing images from across the world. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>Nothing is prescribed; each of these projects reveals the singularity of their creators, their penchant for going against popular taste. These works, each in their own way, invite us to slow down for a while, to take the time to think. They each ask the viewer to travel in thought to faraway places, to become more aware of the incredible diversity of our world—something rare in our current worlds, with its surfeit of images that surround us at all times. </div>
Bodil Furu Evangelia Kranioti
Boychild and Wu Tsang Boris Mitić
 

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Pinault Collection Magazine - Issue #08

 

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