As part of our series of conversations with artists, initiated in 2010 and now totaling more than twenty events, American artist Haim Steinbach (born in Israel in 1944) gave a presentation of his work to an audience gathered at the Teatrino, Interviewed by Caroline Bourgeois.


<!-- ----- auteur ------ --> <div class="col m-4 auteur pull-right"> <div class="inner"> <div class="white"> <a class="switch">Text</a><br> <b>Caroline Bourgeois</b><br> <span>Curator of the exhibition « Accrochage »</span> </div> </div> </div> <br> <br> <br> <!-- ----- titre ------ --> <div class="col m-10"> <span class="title">Haim</span><br><br> <span class="title">Steinbach</span> </div> <!-- ----- texte ------ --> <div class="clearfix"> <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>The lecture took place on November 10, 2016. For over an hour, the artist reflected on his work and career, from the 1970s to today, with the curator and the audience. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>Haim Steinbach’s installations typically examine the formal presentation of art; his work included in the exhibition “Accrochage” is somewhat of an exception in relation to the rest of his oeuvre. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>During his lecture, Steinbach moved chronologically through a slideshow of images of his work, commenting as he retraced the evolution of his career. Steinbach collects and arranges existing objects. At the outset of his career, he would use objects that were given to him or that he found in flea markets. He didn’t consider these as found objects but rather as raw materials, in the same way that a paint tube is a raw material to create a painting. He would then create an arrangement to exhibit these objects, typically using display cases and shelves he designed himself. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>His work has often been interpreted as a critique of consumer society, but Steinbach himself considers that he is creating a portrait of society, in particular capturing the cultural diversity characteristic of New York, where he lives and works. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>Steinbach’s displays reference both the objects’ use and their design. He considers that the function of the image, like that of the object, is the fundamental question addressed by art in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. His work, relying on various objects of different kinds, leads the viewer to reflect on their power as well as their meaning. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>This is certainly true of the work by Steinbach included in “Accrochage,” <i>Display #27 – Barn Wall</i> (1991), which consists quite literally of a barn wall, such as you might find on a typical American farm. Visitors can open the door and peer at its other side. The work evokes certain myths—the cowboy (the Marlboro Man), health, the Far West. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>Steinbach is interested in objects’ power to create desire, in the way in which we look at what provokes that desire, and in how that desire can be transformed by the way in which the object is presented and examined. By placing objects in a new context, Steinbach makes them the subject of our analysis. </div>
 
 

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Pinault Collection Magazine - Issue #08

 

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