<!-- ----- chapeau ------ --> <span class="chapeau">In fall 2016, Palazzo Grassi presented seven films from the documentary series “One Eye, One History,” each focusing on one leading critic of contemporary art. Laurence Bertrand Dorléac, the subject of one of the films, in the series, recalls her participation in the series.</span> <br> <br> <br> <!-- ----- auteur ------ --> <div class="col m-4 auteur pull-right"> <div class="inner"> <div class="white"> <a class="switch">Text</a><br> <b>Laurence Bertrand Dorléac</b><br> <span>Art historian</span> </div> </div> </div> <br> <br> <br> <!-- ----- titre ------ --> <div class="col m-10"> <span class="title">« un œil, une histoire »<br> LA FABRIQUE <br> DE L’HISTOIRE <br> DE L’ART</span> </div> <!-- ----- texte ------ --> <div class="clearfix"> <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>There is so much information available on the lives of novelists, yet none on the lives of art historians. Marianne Alphant and Pascale Bouhénic [directors of the films] wanted to find out more, to witness the work of art historians. Fortunately, Marianne and Pascale are not only great readers, they are also incredible writers themselves. For this series, they used their camera to explore how art history is created. Welcoming them in the morning, I always felt as though I were welcoming women of letters, armed with a cameraman, a boom operator, and an audio technician. The contrast between them made a strange, but charming, impression. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>As I’d always been too busy to spend much time talking about myself, I’d always resisted the idea of participating in a documentary film, until a friend, someone younger than I am, intervened. He pointed out the lack of materials on the subject; he spoke of his generation’s need for role models or guides and their curiosity about the motives and goals of their predecessors, the reasons behind their commitments and opinions, the difficulties or doubts they encountered, and the perseverance that lead them to new discoveries, to formulating a unique viewpoint. Not that the younger generation wants to imitate their elders; but they are eager to better understand the path they took, how they developed their unique ways of looking, thinking, speaking, and writing. This friend later told me that his favorite part of the film, the one that impressed him most, was the moment when “the mask fell away.” In the words of Gilles Deleuze, if you can’t grasp the small trace of madness in someone, then you can’t be their friend. The charm of these films comes from the fact that conversation with these two spirited women allows the subject to go back and forth between the analytical and the confidential, between examining an artwork and sharing personal secrets. The format of the films lends itself well to this informal structure: the critics are presented with ten images they’ve selected, throwing them down onto a table like cards during a poker game, taking them up one by one, and explaining his or her relationship to that specific image. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>For me, which moment was the most intense? Several moments come to mind, but I’ll describe this one: that moment during the morning we spent at the Zoo de Vincennes on a quest to find Nero, the oldest lion there, when we first glimpsed the animals in the distance, surrounded by a dense fog. The scene brought to mind works of contemporary art: for instance, Maurizio Cattelan’s romantic squirrel who commits suicide, seated at his kitchen table, or his horses suspended from a wall, high above us in the air. Then I evoked great artists of the past, from Antoine-Louis Barye to Eugène Delacroix, who would both run to the zoo whenever they heard that an animal there had passed away. That morning had an incredible, melancholy beauty. In the voice-over narration I recorded for some of these scenes, I was inspired to talk about war, about the havoc that men create. You have to have a filmmaker’s eye and a literary soul to make those types of connections happen! </div>



<span class="alinea"></span>“One Eye, One History” series was screened at Teatrino in March 2017 with Philippe-Alain Michaud, Carlo Ginzburg, and the film’s directors Marianne Alphant and Pascale Bouhénic in attendance. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>Nine films about nine art historians: Georges Didi-Huberman, Gilles A. Tiberghien, Rosalind Krauss, Michel Thévoz, Victor Stoichita, Michael Fried, Svetlana Alpers, Roland Recht, and Laurence Bertrand Dorléac. 3 DVDs, Édition Doriane Films, 404 minutes total, French and English versions, with Italian subtitles available for the first five films of the series. Zadig Productions, 2015. <br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>Upcoming films: Carlo Ginzburg, Philippe-Alain Michaud, and Elisabeth Lebovici.
Thierry de Duve,<br> <i>Un message, une adresse</i> 46’, 2015
Thierry de Duve,<br> <i>Un message, une adresse</i> 46’, 2015
Thierry de Duve,<br> <i>Un message, une adresse</i> 46’, 2015
Michael Fried,<br> <i>In Love with Diderot</i> 49’, 2015
Michael Fried,<br> <i>In Love with Diderot</i> 49’, 2015
Michael Fried,<br> <i>In Love with Diderot</i> 49’, 2015
Carlo Ginzburg,<br> <i>Tout m’intéresse là-bas</i> 45’, 2016
Carlo Ginzburg,<br> <i>Tout m’intéresse là-bas</i> 45’, 2016
Carlo Ginzburg,<br> <i>Tout m’intéresse là-bas</i> 45’, 2016
Laurence Bertrand Dorléac,<br> <i>Une passion spéciale</i> 50’, 2016
Laurence Bertrand Dorléac,<br> <i>Une passion spéciale</i> 50’, 2016
Laurence Bertrand Dorléac,<br> <i>Une passion spéciale</i> 50’, 2016
Svetlana Alpers,<br> <i>Distance et étrangeté</i> 48’, 2015
Svetlana Alpers,<br> <i>Distance et étrangeté</i> 48’, 2015
Svetlana Alpers,<br> <i>Distance et étrangeté</i> 48’, 2015
Philippe-Alain Michaud,<br> <i>Le réel traversé par la fiction</i> 41’, 2016
Philippe-Alain Michaud,<br> <i>Le réel traversé par la fiction</i> 41’, 2016
Philippe-Alain Michaud,<br> <i>Le réel traversé par la fiction</i> 41’, 2016
 

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Pinault Collection Magazine - Issue #08

 

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