Nuit Blanche
2017
 
 
The Collection Pinault was invited to participate in the 2017 Nuit Blanche by its curator, Charlotte Laubard. Video works by three artists have been selected: On the one hand, Jermey Deller in the Nelson Mandela garden, and on the other hand, Anri Sala and Luts Bacher in the neighboring église Saint-Eustache, Whose parish has been a historic patron of the arts and participates regularly in the Nuit Blanche.

<div class="col m-4 auteur pull-left noclick"> <div class="inner" style="padding-top:20px;"> <div class="white"> <a class="switch">Interview of</a><br> <b>Charlotte Laubard</b><br> Curator </div> </div> </div> <div class="col m-4 auteur pull-right noclick"> <div class="inner"> <div class="white"> <a class="switch">Interview by</a><br> <b>Caroline Bourgeois</b> </div> </div> </div> <div class="clear"><br><br><br><br><br><br><br></div> <i><u>Caroline Bourgeois</u> — How did you choose and then define a theme for this edition of Nuit Blanche?</i> <br><br> <u>Charlotte Laubard</u> — This is the second time that I have been given the opportunity to organize a large-scale event in the public spaces (the first was the event “Imagine Now” in 2010, in Bordeaux). Each time, examining the context in which the project will take place and the identity of the host city is key. Nuit Blanche is unique in that: for one night only, it alters our perception and experience of public space. While people are becoming more withdrawn, less certain of their identity, I wanted to emphasize and reaffirm that social interaction is at the heart of public space. Today we often discuss how best to “live together,” but how does that come together in the cultural sphere? My goal is to present different ways of working together: collaborations among artists, multidisciplinary research groups, citizen initiatives, but also works by individual artists like Jeremy Deller, a key figure in this reflection. <br><br> <i><u>CB</u> — Then you also had to choose the locations of the works, the neighborhoods, and consider the needs of the audience.</i> <br><br> <u>CL</u> — Nuit Blanche will naturally take place in public spaces that are symbolic of the Parisian melting pot. A first group of installations is scattered around the Halles, at the very heart of Paris and the entryway into the city for many of its visitors, and the Place de la République, an important historic site, where protests and demonstrations have taken place for centuries and continue to this day. Also, the Parc des Rives de Seine is a new public space that will be available to host all kinds of events. I also wanted Nuit Blanche to reach more working-class neighborhoods: I chose La Chapelle, a neighborhood shaped by decades of migratory flows and that continues to change rapidly today. Some events will even take place in abandoned buildings or construction sites that will soon be transformed, offering the public the unique opportunity to discover them before they disappear forever. <br><br> <i><u>CB</u> — You included collaborative works as well as works by individual artists. How did you create an equilibrium between the two?</i> <br><br> <u>CL</u> — This edition of Nuit Blanche was deeply influenced by my experience as one of the co-founders and organizers of the Société Suisse des Nouveaux Commanditaires (Swiss Society of New Patrons). This program, initiated by the Fondation de France, gives people from all kinds of cultural and professional backgrounds the opportunity to commission work from an artist, to be installed in a public space. To me, this initiative is symbolic of the new kinds of collaborations between artists and their audience that are prompting us to reexamine the role of art in society today. I am not suggesting that art could replace social action—if it did, it would forever lose its unique ontology. But it is time to consider that art could have additional uses and functions beyond providing a moment of erudite reflection, the role to which art has traditionally been relegated in western societies. The agency of a work of art, meaning its ability to activate a network of intentions, projections, interpretations, and uses, is what gives it power, legitimacy, and a sphere of influence. Art is decidedly a social act. <br><br><br><br>
 
Anri SALA <br><i>Uomoduomo</i>, 2000 <br>Color video <br>1’34’’
<span class="title">Anri Sala</span><br><br> <div class="clearfix"><span class="alinea"></span>Anri Sala (born in 1974 in Albania) studied art in Tirana then at Le Fresnoy, in Tourcoing. In <i>Uomoduomo</i>, we see a frail old man, perhaps homeless, slumped over and sleeping fitfully on a bench in the Duomo, Milan’s cathedral. The presentation of this moving work in the Eglise Saint-Eustache is a homage to the Parisian parish’s commitment to artistic and social causes over the centuries.</div>
 
Lutz Bacher <br><i>PLEASE (LC)</i>, 2013–15 <br>Four channels video, sound <br>Canal 1 : 53’49’’ <br>Canal 2 : 44’50’’ <br>Canal 3 : 46’28’’ <br>Canal 4 : 53’49’’
<span class="title">Lutz Bacher</span><br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>Lutz Bacher (a pseudonym for the artist, born in 1962) is an American artist living in New York. In her work, she uses found objects borrowed from popular culture, which she appropriates to place them in original contexts. In <i>PLEASE (LC)</i>, a video is projected successively across four screens positioned side by side. During these few, almost cacophonous seconds, Leonard Cohen repeats the word “please” over and over again, like the voices in a canon, a gentle plea or an invitation to pray.
 
Jeremy DELLER <br><i>English Magic</i>, 2013 <br>Color video, sound <br>14’23’’
<span class="title">Jeremy Deller</span><br><br> <span class="alinea"></span>Jeremy Deller (born in 1966 in London), recipient of the prestigious Turner Prize in 2004, finds inspiration in popular culture, folklore, and social codes to create participative, generous, and critical works. In <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/video/2013/may/29/venice-biennale-jeremy-deller-english-magic-video" target="_blank" class="scrolltext-link jquerylink"><i>English magic</i></a>, an orchestra of amateur percussionists play pieces by diverse composers, ranging from Vaughan Williams to David Bowie, in the famous Abbey Road studio in London, where the Beatles recorded most of their albums. Their performance is interrupted by various sequences, some fascinating, some banal: slow-motion footage of vultures flying in circles overhead, Land Rovers being demolished, a parade, Stonehenge as an inflatable toy… Conceived for the 55<sup>th</sup> Venice Biennial in 2013, this work is both a subversive celebration and a biting critique of British cultural history.
 

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