In collaboration with the French pavilion of the 57th Venice Biennale, organized by curators Lionel Bovier and Christian Marclay, artist Xavier Veilhan invited Lee Scratch Perry (born in 1936) to perform at the Teatrino in July 2017. Veilhan describes his encounter with the legendary Jamaican musician and producer and his hope that Studio Venezia [Veilhan’s project for the Biennale], “would entice him to become its godfather, alongside Nigel Godrich.”


<div class="col m-10"> <span class="title">Lee</span><br><br> <span class="title">Scratch Perry</span> </div> <div class="col m-4 auteur pull-right"> <div class="inner"> <div class="white"> <a class="switch">Text</a><br> <b>Xavier Veilhan</b><br> <span style="display: none;"> Artist </span> </div> </div> </div> <div class="clear"><br><br><br></div> <span class="alinea"></span>Lee Scratch Perry is an important figure in the history of twentieth-century music. His innovative use of different techniques transformed Jamaican music from a local to a global phenomenon. Perry was a pioneer in the development of a new musical style, called dub music, which relied on his innovative production style and recording methods. He is such a legendary figure that meeting him for the first time in London felt surreal. The project involved creating his portrait with a 3D printer just before a concert, in the very room in which he would soon be performing. Right up to the very last minute, it was unclear whether we would actually be able to meet him. As I was walking into his hotel to find out when he would arrive, I ran into him in the lobby, wearing his hat, decorated with a CD, and holding his red computer open. He was there, ignoring the chaos that his presence was causing. On the computer screen, in huge letters, were the definitive rasta statements he wanted me to engrave on his statue.
 

Pinault Collection

Pinault Collection Magazine - Issue #09

 

Pinault Collection

Archives